Wyoming Energy Projects Draw Clean Energy Leader to State

ClearPath Founder Jay Faison Visited WY to Tour Projects, Meets with Leaders

 

Cheyenne, Wyoming – Wyoming’s pioneering clean energy efforts drew national attention this week from a conservative clean energy advocate who visited the Cowboy State to get a firsthand look at many of its projects and to sit down with Gov. Matt Mead and other government officials and private sector leaders.

ClearPath Foundation Founder and CEO Jay Faison made a two-day trek, stopping in Cheyenne, Laramie and Riverton to learn about diverse energy technologies being deployed, pursued and perfected throughout Wyoming.

“It was invaluable sitting down with Gov. Mead and seeing the on-the-ground progress Wyoming state and private leaders are making,” Faison said. “From the Big Sand Draw enhanced oil recovery project to the advanced research being undertaken at the  state university and elsewhere, Wyoming can take great pride in having some of the top minds working on the cutting-edge carbon capture and other innovation that will help shape our clean energy future.”

“Establishing relationships and facilitating conversations with national leaders on clean energy technologies is critical to ensuring Wyoming continues to be at the forefront of these advancements,” said Executive Director of the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority Jason Begger. “Mr. Faison and his team at ClearPath bring a conservative approach to advancing clean energy projects with a strong emphasis on spurring American innovation through smaller government and support of private sector solutions – something that really resonates here in Wyoming.”

“We hope Mr. Faison’s visit to Wyoming is one of many and that we can continue this conversation, and potentially find avenues to work together, well into the future,” Begger continued.

Faison met with Governor Mead as well as legislative leaders in Cheyenne; toured the University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources; and surveyed Devon Energy’s Enhanced Oil Recovery operation in Riverton. Faison was also scheduled to visit Basin Electric Power Cooperative’s Dry Fork Station, as well as the future site of the Wyoming ITC, but was unable to make the trip to Gillette due to inclement weather.

ClearPath is becoming a leading advocate of conservative clean energy ideas, including technologies that can capture and store carbon emissions from coal power plants and then use that carbon to improve oil recovery. Based in Charlotte, N.C., and Washington, D.C., ClearPath also works with state and federal Republican leaders to bolster natural gas, nuclear, hydropower and energy innovation in order to promote clean and reliable power that can help the economy, national security and the environment.

To learn more about ClearPath, visit clearpath.org.

 

About the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority

The Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA), is an instrumentality of the State of Wyoming whose purpose is to advance Wyoming’s Energy Strategy by promoting the value of Wyoming’s energy resources, supporting expanded infrastructure, enhancing resource development and operation, and ensuring a credible and objective voice for Wyoming. $1 billion in bonding authority was given to the WIA for the financing of infrastructure relative to facilities within its legislative purview. The authority was created by the State Legislature in 2004 and is governed by a five-member Board of Directors appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Wyoming State Senate.